Wiz Khalifa Speaks On Police Brutality in Pittsburgh & Says Kanye West Views Him As Competition

wiz-khalifa-closed-eyes-2015-billboard-650
wiz-khalifa-closed-eyes-2015-billboard-650

Wiz Khalifa is out promoting the release of his latest project “Rolling Papers 2”.

In promotion for the his second album release of the year, Wiz recently sat down with Playboy and opened up about the police brutality in his hometown of Pittsburgh, Kanye West viewing him as competition, and so much more.

Via: TheShadeRoom

 

“Cops there are crazy,” he said. “I’ve never been pulled over without them having a gun to my head. Even with traffic stops, they’ll put a gun to your head and say, “Get the f*ck out the car. What you got?” Searching you, breaking sh*t, twisting your arm. They’re cool about weed, though. I got jammed up a lot in Pittsburgh, but I never did real time.”

Some of you may recall Leon Ford, the young man who was pulled over, falsely identified, shot, and paralyzed and then tried in court for criminal charges in Pittsburgh. Or Jordan Miles, the high schoolers the Pittsburgh Police assumed to be a drug dealer while walking to visit his grandmother. They beat him–bad. Like many other U.S. cities, Pittsburgh has also had its fair share of run-ins with police brutality — even pre-celebrities.

Wiz even went as far as to describe Pittsburgh for what he experienced. It’s ironic because Pittsburgh was ranked one of the most livable cities but guys like Wiz experience first hand the risk of walking to the park and being killed while en route.

“It was f*****-up and really dark. A lot of shootings and gang violence. I saw people get killed. You’d get off the bus and somebody would be dead and they’d be cleaning it up. A lot of waking up in the morning and seeing people you knew dead on the news.”

Sheesh!

Moving forward, Wiz finally opened up about his Twitter beef with Kanye, y’all! Wiz claims he was just being him and at the end of the day, Kanye views him as competition and therefore acts accordingly.

“That was a weird situation, because it was something I would do in real life. All I did was speak my mind. I’m a Max B fan, and if me and Kanye were in a room and he said, “Yo, I’mma name my album Waves,” I’d be like, “Don’t do that. You’re not allowed to do that.” Nobody really does that these days. Nobody checks n***** like, “Nah, n****.” No one is above being spoken to, and if you’ve got real friends, they’ll tell you how they feel. That’s how I handle all my situations in real life. Even if I have a problem with somebody, I’m not gonna advertise it. We can go around the corner and we can really do it. But all in front of people? That’s not me. N*ggas talk sh*t every day, and n*ggas say sh*t about my ex, n*ggas say sh*t about my kid. It’s all good. There’s competition in rap, and Kanye obviously sees me as that.”

Lastly, he spoke about the Black Lives Matter Movement,

“It’s about knowledge. A lot of people are surprised that this still exists, and when the media puts it out there, people get upset. But it’s about education and figuring out how to defend yourself and how to fight back and not be a victim. They victimize us because we don’t know. Body cameras? That sh*t is just to make people think we’re safe. We ain’t safe. It’s not about fighting the cops physically. You have to know how to outsmart them, and what they can and can’t do to you. That won’t make things all good, but it will help level the playing field.”