Humans Have Already Used Up The Earth’s Resources For 2015

MARANHAO STATE, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 21:  Afro-Brazilians fish with traditional methods practiced for centuries in a wetland area of a deforested section of the Amazon basin on November 21, 2014 in Maranhao state, Brazil. Many Amazon wetlands are disappearing due to cattle ranching which plays a significant role in Amazon deforestation. The non-governmental group Imazon recently warned that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon skyrocketed 450 percent in October of this year compared with the same month last year. The United Nations climate change conference begins December 1 in neighboring Peru.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
MARANHAO STATE, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 21:  Afro-Brazilians fish with traditional methods practiced for centuries in a wetland area of a deforested section of the Amazon basin on November 21, 2014 in Maranhao state, Brazil. Many Amazon wetlands are disappearing due to cattle ranching which plays a significant role in Amazon deforestation. The non-governmental group Imazon recently warned that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon skyrocketed 450 percent in October of this year compared with the same month last year. The United Nations climate change conference begins December 1 in neighboring Peru.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The Earth is so heavily populated, and growing, that we’re already using up resources that our future children should be using.

At the rate we’re going, there might not be any natural resources left for future generations to utilize.

Via: HuffingtonPost

Less than eight months into 2015, humans have already consumed a year’s worth of the Earth’s resources. 

earth

Ecological Debt Day, or Earth Overshoot Day, falls on Thursday and marks the point in the year when “humanity’s annual demand for the goods and services that our land and seas can provide — fruits and vegetables, meat, fish, wood, cotton for clothing, and carbon dioxide absorption — exceeds what Earth’s ecosystems can renew in a year,” the international think tank Global Footprint Network explains in the video below.

This means that for the rest of 2015, we will be “living on resources borrowed from future generations,” the World Wildlife Fund said. It’s like overdrawing a bank account. 

The earth is going into ecological debt earlier each year, The Guardian notes. This year’s Earth Overshoot Day is six days ahead of last year’s, and months earlier than in 2000, when it arrived in October.

Global Footprint Network and other experts say addressing the growing problem of overpopulation is a cornerstone of reducing ecological debt. John R. Wilmoth, director of the United Nations Population Division, announced Monday that the world population of 7.3 billion people is predicted to reach 9.7 billion by 2050 and up to 13.3 billion by 2100. He said there’s only a 23 percent chance that the world’s population will stop growing before the end of the century.

The U.S. is the world’s ninth-biggest resource hog, using 310 percent of its capacity for resources, Global Footprint Network data shows. Top offenders are the United Arab Emirates (750 percent), Singapore (590 percent) and Belgium (460 percent.)